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Thu, June 17, 2021 | 18:19
  1. Celebrating Korea-Czech relations
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
    Visitors to the National Museum of Korea take a look at Bohemian glass relics at a special exhibition marking the 25th anniversary of diplomatic relations between Korea and the Czech Republic, Monday. The exhibition runs until April 26. / Yonhap
  2. To-be-built dormitory
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
    Ewha Womans University President Kim Sun-uk, right, points to an artist’s rendering of a dormitory planned for the school’s campus in Seoul, Tuesday, during a groundbreaking ceremony. Those listening to her are, from left, Choi Kyung-hee, the next president of the university; Chang Myong-sue, head of Ewha Haktang; Yoon Hoo-jung, Ewha’s honorary president; and Seoul Mayor Park Won-soon./ Courtesy of Ewha Womans University
  3. Return of Goryeo treasure
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
    An ancient chest used to store Buddhist texts is on display during a ceremony at the National Museum of Korea, Tuesday. The nation’s flagship museum acquired the rare Goryeo Kingdom (918—1392) heritage from a Japanese collector./ Yonhap
  4. Beauty pageant
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
    2014 Miss Korea Kim Seo-yeon, 22, waves after winning the annual pageant at the Olympic Hall in the Olympic Park, southern Seoul, Tuesday. The first runners-up were Lee Seo-bin, 21, and Shin Su-min, 20; the second runners-up were Kim Myeong-seon, 21, Sarah Lee, 23, Baek Ji-hyun, 21, and Ryu So-ra, 20. The Hankook Ilbo, a sister paper of The Korea Times, organized the beauty contest./ Korea Times photo by Wang Tae-seok
  5. Dami Im in Seoul
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
    Dami Im, who was the winner of the Australian audition program “The X-Factor” last year sings at the showcase for her debut  album “Dami Im” in Samseong-dong, Seoul, Wednesday. / Yonhap
  6. Ready for new album in Japan
    Hallyu star Kim Hyun-joong, a member of K-pop group SS501, unveiled his photo to be included in his upcoming single album which will be released in June in Japan. The album titled “Hot Sun” will be his fourth single to be released in Japan. / Courtesy of Key East
    Hallyu star Kim Hyun-joong, a member of K-pop group SS501, unveiled his photo to be included in his upcoming single album which will be released in June in Japan. The album titled “Hot Sun” will be his fourth single to be released in Japan. / Courtesy of Key East
  7. Enjoying spring while social distancing [PHOTOS]
    Cherry Blossom trees bloom along the National Mall following a rain shower March 28, in Washington, D.C. The Japanese cherry trees were gifted to Washington, D.C. by Tokyo Mayor Yukio Ozaki in 1912 and draw tens of thousands of daily visitors around peak bloom every year. AFP-YonhapBy Kang Hyun-kyungSpring came anyway. It survived the pandemic. Forsythias and azaleas signal the coming of the new season after a harsh, frozen winter. Cherry blossoms make us feel a season for life has just begun. Spring is not the same it used to be in the wake of the pandemic.Before the pandemic, spring was the season people looked forward to for gatherings and vacations.A flower bouquet is laid out on rainy farmland in Hanam, Gyeonggi Province, on March 28. YonhapCherry blossoms invited tourists from distant cities. Nationwide tourist attractions were crowded with overjoyed strangers.For trees and flowers, spring was the season to suffer. The coming of spring signaled torture. Walking along the cherry blossom-lined street, careless people picked flowers and tree branches to keep them as souvenirs of their visits.A man wearing a protective face mask takes a photo among blooming cherry blossoms amid the COVID-19 pandemic, in Tokyo, Japan, March 23. Reuters-YonhapOver-tourism led the flower petals to fall from trees early. Tourists then walked all over the fallen petals. The pandemic has enabled humans to put themselves into the shoes of other types of life. Amid the pandemic, people feel uneasy as they are still locked down and unable to visit those places again. They are missing the good old days as they forgo traveling.A bird’s eye view photo shows a green onion field on Imja Island in Sinan County, South Jeolla Province, on March 23. YonhapThe pandemic, however, is a blessing to plants. Mother Nature is intact, and so are her children. With fewer tourists, flowers bloom and die in their due dates. Flowers fall when times are ripe. Fallen leaves are not tortured by passersby.Climbers walk along a forsythia-filled trail on Seoul’s Mount Inwang on March 29. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSpring has become a livable season for plants, thanks to the pandemic. Let there be spring for Mother Nature and her kids. 
    Cherry Blossom trees bloom along the National Mall following a rain shower March 28, in Washington, D.C. The Japanese cherry trees were gifted to Washington, D.C. by Tokyo Mayor Yukio Ozaki in 1912 and draw tens of thousands of daily visitors around peak bloom every year. AFP-YonhapBy Kang Hyun-kyungSpring came anyway. It survived the pandemic. Forsythias and azaleas signal the coming of the new season after a harsh, frozen winter. Cherry blossoms make us feel a season for life has just begun. Spring is not the same it used to be in the wake of the pandemic.Before the pandemic, spring was the season people looked forward to for gatherings and vacations.A flower bouquet is laid out on rainy farmland in Hanam, Gyeonggi Province, on March 28. YonhapCherry blossoms invited tourists from distant cities. Nationwide tourist attractions were crowded with overjoyed strangers.For trees and flowers, spring was the season to suffer. The coming of spring signaled torture. Walking along the cherry blossom-lined street, careless people picked flowers and tree branches to keep them as souvenirs of their visits.A man wearing a protective face mask takes a photo among blooming cherry blossoms amid the COVID-19 pandemic, in Tokyo, Japan, March 23. Reuters-YonhapOver-tourism led the flower petals to fall from trees early. Tourists then walked all over the fallen petals. The pandemic has enabled humans to put themselves into the shoes of other types of life. Amid the pandemic, people feel uneasy as they are still locked down and unable to visit those places again. They are missing the good old days as they forgo traveling.A bird’s eye view photo shows a green onion field on Imja Island in Sinan County, South Jeolla Province, on March 23. YonhapThe pandemic, however, is a blessing to plants. Mother Nature is intact, and so are her children. With fewer tourists, flowers bloom and die in their due dates. Flowers fall when times are ripe. Fallen leaves are not tortured by passersby.Climbers walk along a forsythia-filled trail on Seoul’s Mount Inwang on March 29. Korea Times photo by Shim Hyun-chulSpring has become a livable season for plants, thanks to the pandemic. Let there be spring for Mother Nature and her kids. 
  8. Life goes on despite pandemic [PHOTOS]
    Two elderly men play "baduk," a board game in front of a corner store in Euljiro, Seoul, on March 12. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukBy Kang Hyung-kyungThings are steadily going back to normal as the COVID-19 pandemic enters its second year. The elderly begin to play ‘janggi,’ a Korean board game, in the street. Wary of virus contamination, they’re armed with safety gear ― face masks ― which hide their emotions. Janggi is a pandemic sport. People usually play it outside the home. It doesn’t require much talk between players because it is all about strategy. People try to figure out their opponents’ next move and they move their pieces accordingly.People gather in front of a “lucky” lottery store to buy tickets near Namdaemun Market. The crowded lottery store amid the pandemic reflects that pandemic-weary people are clinging to hope for a lucky break. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA woman takes a nap at a currency exchange store near Namdaemun Market in Seoul on March 11. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukAccustomed to the pandemic lifestyle, people walk a fine line between social distancing and social life. They have begun to gather outside but avoid places that are expected to be crowded.Middle-aged delivery women carrying food trays on their heads are spotted again here and there in markets. The scene was all too familiar during pre-pandemic days.A woman carries a food tray on her head in Namdaemun Market. She told The Korea Times that she has been delivering hot meals for her customers all throughout the pandemic without missing a single day. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukDelivery women had disappeared since the outbreak began last year, as people chose to eat alone at home and stopped socializing with others. Seeing the delivery women back at work signals that market merchants, their main customers, are resuming their businesses. The food delivered is warm enough to eat right away without heating in the microwave.With the steady return of pre-pandemic life, resilience in our lives is back.A merchant selling street food is waiting for customers on March 11. Merchants of traditional markets were among the hardest hit by the pandemic as virus-wary people stopped dropping by. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
    Two elderly men play "baduk," a board game in front of a corner store in Euljiro, Seoul, on March 12. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukBy Kang Hyung-kyungThings are steadily going back to normal as the COVID-19 pandemic enters its second year. The elderly begin to play ‘janggi,’ a Korean board game, in the street. Wary of virus contamination, they’re armed with safety gear ― face masks ― which hide their emotions. Janggi is a pandemic sport. People usually play it outside the home. It doesn’t require much talk between players because it is all about strategy. People try to figure out their opponents’ next move and they move their pieces accordingly.People gather in front of a “lucky” lottery store to buy tickets near Namdaemun Market. The crowded lottery store amid the pandemic reflects that pandemic-weary people are clinging to hope for a lucky break. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukA woman takes a nap at a currency exchange store near Namdaemun Market in Seoul on March 11. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukAccustomed to the pandemic lifestyle, people walk a fine line between social distancing and social life. They have begun to gather outside but avoid places that are expected to be crowded.Middle-aged delivery women carrying food trays on their heads are spotted again here and there in markets. The scene was all too familiar during pre-pandemic days.A woman carries a food tray on her head in Namdaemun Market. She told The Korea Times that she has been delivering hot meals for her customers all throughout the pandemic without missing a single day. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-sukDelivery women had disappeared since the outbreak began last year, as people chose to eat alone at home and stopped socializing with others. Seeing the delivery women back at work signals that market merchants, their main customers, are resuming their businesses. The food delivered is warm enough to eat right away without heating in the microwave.With the steady return of pre-pandemic life, resilience in our lives is back.A merchant selling street food is waiting for customers on March 11. Merchants of traditional markets were among the hardest hit by the pandemic as virus-wary people stopped dropping by. Korea Times photo by Choi Won-suk
  9. While everyone sleeps [PHOTOS]
    A rail worker breathes out while working on Donghae Nambu Line near Taehwagang Station in the southeastern coastal city of Ulsan early in the morning on Jan. 21. YonhapPublic workers risk their lives to keep us safe. They are the spine of our society. By Kwon Mee-yooClean streets, public transportation and parcel service are all parts of everyday life, despite often being taken for granted. However, such services are made possible through the efforts of many unseen laborers. Despite the importance of their role, many laborers are exposed to industrial disasters and work-related accidents.A rail worker leaves a worksite with a ladder on his shoulder after finishing up feeder wiring on Donghae Nambu Line near Taehwagang Station in Ulsan on Jan. 21. YonhapIn 2020, a total of 882 people died from industrial accidents, 27 more than the previous year. Despite the government’s pledge to halve the number of workers killed in the line of duty during its term, the number rebounded from 855 in 2019, after declining from 971 in 2018.Hands are busy connecting and maintaining the feeders, which are crucial to train operation as they provide electricity, but are exposed to hazards in dangerous working conditions without enough safety features. YonhapThe increase was due to big accidents such as a warehouse construction site fire in April in Icheon, Gyeonggi Province, which killed 38 workers. Earlier this month, the National Assembly passed a law on severe industrial accidents, which holds businesses responsible for breach of safety requirements in case of serious workplace accidents and imposes tougher punishments on them. But industrial accidents continue to happen across the country.Rail workers wire an electricity feeder on Donghae Nambu Line near Taehwagang Station in Ulsan on Jan. 21. Yonhap
    A rail worker breathes out while working on Donghae Nambu Line near Taehwagang Station in the southeastern coastal city of Ulsan early in the morning on Jan. 21. YonhapPublic workers risk their lives to keep us safe. They are the spine of our society. By Kwon Mee-yooClean streets, public transportation and parcel service are all parts of everyday life, despite often being taken for granted. However, such services are made possible through the efforts of many unseen laborers. Despite the importance of their role, many laborers are exposed to industrial disasters and work-related accidents.A rail worker leaves a worksite with a ladder on his shoulder after finishing up feeder wiring on Donghae Nambu Line near Taehwagang Station in Ulsan on Jan. 21. YonhapIn 2020, a total of 882 people died from industrial accidents, 27 more than the previous year. Despite the government’s pledge to halve the number of workers killed in the line of duty during its term, the number rebounded from 855 in 2019, after declining from 971 in 2018.Hands are busy connecting and maintaining the feeders, which are crucial to train operation as they provide electricity, but are exposed to hazards in dangerous working conditions without enough safety features. YonhapThe increase was due to big accidents such as a warehouse construction site fire in April in Icheon, Gyeonggi Province, which killed 38 workers. Earlier this month, the National Assembly passed a law on severe industrial accidents, which holds businesses responsible for breach of safety requirements in case of serious workplace accidents and imposes tougher punishments on them. But industrial accidents continue to happen across the country.Rail workers wire an electricity feeder on Donghae Nambu Line near Taehwagang Station in Ulsan on Jan. 21. Yonhap
  10. Polar vortex grips Korea [PHOTOS]
    People take a stroll despite the cold weather casting long shadows at Gongjicheon Amusement Park in Chuncheon, Gangwon Province, Jan. 5. YonhapBy Kwon Mee-yooThe mercury has dipped way below freezing this winter and an Arctic cold air mass that swept across the country has been behind the frigid temperatures.Seoul saw temperatures drop to minus 18.6 degrees Celsius, Jan. 8, which was the lowest in 35 years. The lowest-ever temperature recorded in Seoul was minus 19.2 degrees Celsius, Jan. 5, 1986, according to the Korea Meteorological Administration, which began collecting such data in 1980. Buildings in downtown Seoul emit steam Jan. 8, when Seoul experienced its coldest temperature in 35 years at minus 18.6 degrees Celcius. YonhapTemperatures in the mountainous areas of Gangwon Province dropped to nearly minus 30 degrees.The cold spell also blanketed the country in thick snow. Jeju Island received over 50 centimeters of snow last week, with the accumulated snowfall on Mount Halla reaching up to 140 centimeters.Fishing boats stand in the frozen waters of the Geumgwang Reservoir in Anseong, Gyeonggi Province, Jan. 4. YonhapHeavy snowfall turned the local landscape into a white wonderland, but the seemingly beautiful scenery created some major headaches too. Heavy snow advisories and warnings had been issued and huge traffic jams stretched for kilometers along snow-covered roads in many parts of the country, while trains and flights were canceled.A neighborhood in northern Gwangju, a metropolitan city about 330 kilometers south of Seoul, is covered after heavy snowfall amid a cold wave warning issued Jan. 7. YonhapMost food delivery services, which have become practically indispensable during the COVID-19 pandemic, were also suspended due to concerns over the safety of motorcycle delivery people amid the heavy snowfall. As the extreme cold snap gripped Korea, over 7,500 reports of frozen and burst water meters were made from Jan. 6 to 11 and power demand reached an all-time high, causing blackouts in more than 78,000 homes across the country.People go canoeing on Soyang River in Chuncheon, Gangwon Province, Jan. 8, when the province's morning low plummeted to minus 29.1 degrees Celsius. Yonhap
    People take a stroll despite the cold weather casting long shadows at Gongjicheon Amusement Park in Chuncheon, Gangwon Province, Jan. 5. YonhapBy Kwon Mee-yooThe mercury has dipped way below freezing this winter and an Arctic cold air mass that swept across the country has been behind the frigid temperatures.Seoul saw temperatures drop to minus 18.6 degrees Celsius, Jan. 8, which was the lowest in 35 years. The lowest-ever temperature recorded in Seoul was minus 19.2 degrees Celsius, Jan. 5, 1986, according to the Korea Meteorological Administration, which began collecting such data in 1980. Buildings in downtown Seoul emit steam Jan. 8, when Seoul experienced its coldest temperature in 35 years at minus 18.6 degrees Celcius. YonhapTemperatures in the mountainous areas of Gangwon Province dropped to nearly minus 30 degrees.The cold spell also blanketed the country in thick snow. Jeju Island received over 50 centimeters of snow last week, with the accumulated snowfall on Mount Halla reaching up to 140 centimeters.Fishing boats stand in the frozen waters of the Geumgwang Reservoir in Anseong, Gyeonggi Province, Jan. 4. YonhapHeavy snowfall turned the local landscape into a white wonderland, but the seemingly beautiful scenery created some major headaches too. Heavy snow advisories and warnings had been issued and huge traffic jams stretched for kilometers along snow-covered roads in many parts of the country, while trains and flights were canceled.A neighborhood in northern Gwangju, a metropolitan city about 330 kilometers south of Seoul, is covered after heavy snowfall amid a cold wave warning issued Jan. 7. YonhapMost food delivery services, which have become practically indispensable during the COVID-19 pandemic, were also suspended due to concerns over the safety of motorcycle delivery people amid the heavy snowfall. As the extreme cold snap gripped Korea, over 7,500 reports of frozen and burst water meters were made from Jan. 6 to 11 and power demand reached an all-time high, causing blackouts in more than 78,000 homes across the country.People go canoeing on Soyang River in Chuncheon, Gangwon Province, Jan. 8, when the province's morning low plummeted to minus 29.1 degrees Celsius. Yonhap
  11. Tangerine tea on Jeju: A sip of comfort [PHOTOS]
    This aerial shot shows tangerine peels being dried near the ocean in Jeju’s Seogwipo City. Cows graze in the pasture during spring, summer and fall and the area turns into orange color with tangerine peels being dried in winter. Dried tangerine peels are dried again with hot air and then are ground into powder to be used for skincare products, herbal medicine and feed for dairy cows. Courtest of Choi Jae-youngBy Kang Hyun-kyungStone, wind and women. These three are inseparable from the southern resort island of Jeju. Abundant stones are the result of past volcanic activities. Being surrounded by ocean, Jeju is windy. Women on Jeju are born to be strong. Perhaps more so than women in urban areas, Jeju women multitask to feed their children and send them to school as they dive, farm and make house. In wintertime, three more truly iconic Jeju scenes appear: tangerine tea, camellia and the island covered with snow. Tangerine peels being dried under the sun off the ocean creates iconic wintertime scenery on the island. Farmers peel the rind from tangerines and lay it out near the water. They are dried by the sun and the sea winds for years. The islanders sip a cup of tangerine tea with the dried peels to beat cold spells during winter. The dried tangerine peels are also used for herbal medicine to help the local farmers stay healthy. Red camellia flowers are covered with snow. They will bloom in winter and then the petals will fade. Courtesy of Choi Jae-youngJeju is a rare place where people can watch flowers bloom during winter. Camellias are in full bloom between December and April. The islanders use camellia oil for various purposes: some use it for their hair and other skincare purposes, some for food. The flower is commonly spotted there because the islanders planted the trees to protect their houses from strong winds. Snow falls in Jeju Stone Park in the island’s rustic town of Jocheon in this undated photo. The eco park is a living exhibit of the local culture related to stone. Courtest of Choi Jae-youngJeju Stone Park covered with snow creates another wintertime sight to see. Stretching over 3.2 million square meters of territory in the rustic township of Jocheon, the natural park showcases several mythical figures and a goddess who are said to have created the island. The park offers a rare glimpse into the lives of the islanders and their culture. 
    This aerial shot shows tangerine peels being dried near the ocean in Jeju’s Seogwipo City. Cows graze in the pasture during spring, summer and fall and the area turns into orange color with tangerine peels being dried in winter. Dried tangerine peels are dried again with hot air and then are ground into powder to be used for skincare products, herbal medicine and feed for dairy cows. Courtest of Choi Jae-youngBy Kang Hyun-kyungStone, wind and women. These three are inseparable from the southern resort island of Jeju. Abundant stones are the result of past volcanic activities. Being surrounded by ocean, Jeju is windy. Women on Jeju are born to be strong. Perhaps more so than women in urban areas, Jeju women multitask to feed their children and send them to school as they dive, farm and make house. In wintertime, three more truly iconic Jeju scenes appear: tangerine tea, camellia and the island covered with snow. Tangerine peels being dried under the sun off the ocean creates iconic wintertime scenery on the island. Farmers peel the rind from tangerines and lay it out near the water. They are dried by the sun and the sea winds for years. The islanders sip a cup of tangerine tea with the dried peels to beat cold spells during winter. The dried tangerine peels are also used for herbal medicine to help the local farmers stay healthy. Red camellia flowers are covered with snow. They will bloom in winter and then the petals will fade. Courtesy of Choi Jae-youngJeju is a rare place where people can watch flowers bloom during winter. Camellias are in full bloom between December and April. The islanders use camellia oil for various purposes: some use it for their hair and other skincare purposes, some for food. The flower is commonly spotted there because the islanders planted the trees to protect their houses from strong winds. Snow falls in Jeju Stone Park in the island’s rustic town of Jocheon in this undated photo. The eco park is a living exhibit of the local culture related to stone. Courtest of Choi Jae-youngJeju Stone Park covered with snow creates another wintertime sight to see. Stretching over 3.2 million square meters of territory in the rustic township of Jocheon, the natural park showcases several mythical figures and a goddess who are said to have created the island. The park offers a rare glimpse into the lives of the islanders and their culture. 
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